Thanksgiving Stressful For You? Here Are Some Helpful Tips to Help You Get Through the Holidays

We all know Thanksgiving can be a pretty stressful time for people.

Whether its the stress of having family and friends over, preparing meals for big numbers, or the conversations and the different personalities all under one roof at the same time.

Whatever it is... You're not alone!

As stressful as Thanksgiving can be, there are so many opportunities and a ton of potential for the holiday to be a fun and joyful weekend, filled with gratitude, love and connection.

Find that hard to conceive? Don't know where to begin?



1. Compassion

"Oh hey, stress! There you are! I remember, your pretty normal!"


It's okay if you get anxiety before the holidays. The last thing you need is to add the feelings of guilt for feeling anxious about gathering with friends and family.


Remember to breathe and give yourself self-care techniques that will ground you.


I love going outside with my dog to take a few deep breathes and to soak up some nature.


Another I love is when a family member says something that may be triggering, remeber before you react, take a moment to realize where THEY are coming from.


What's the reason for that comment or response? What is going on for them where they feel that was necessary?


Whatever the answer that comes to mind, realize that it has nothing to do with you.



2. Self-Care

Don't want to participate in a family game or family ritual? That's totally okay.


Fill the time with something that fulfills YOU.


While my family loves to play cards and get competitive. I'm not a fan and so I stay nearby (and stay present) but I just read a book or do something else that I love. That way, you're still with your family but just not doing something that makes you feel anxiety.



3. Reframing

We all know that weight or nutrition is going to come up eventually. It's almost a given!


If you know its a trigger for you. Take care of yourself by preparing a few reframing conversation converters.


If your aunt or someone starts talking about her weight or your weight, remember a reframing statement you've used before that has helped you in the past.


"It's so interesting, ever since I stopped restricting or dieting, I've found I've had so much more mental and emotional room to take care of other areas in my life. Etc. Etc."


Preparing yourself with reframing comments allows us to prepare for those uncomfortable moments that can make our skin crawl and make us withdrawal.



3. Gratitude and Goals

Be thankful for what you have of course, but what do you want moving forward?


Maybe instead of sitting and saying around the table, what are you thankful for this year, get your family members to start a new conversation around the goals they want to achieve this year.


It brings some pretty amazing conversation when people open up about their goals and why it's important to them!


(Given it isn't goals about weight).


If "I want to lose weight" comes up, challenge your loved one by asking them to be more specific.


"Can you be more specific? Do you want to lose weight because you want to take care of your health because you want to walk more, be more active with your kids, etc., etc.?"


Often, the real reason and insecurity they have around their weight will emerge when you give them an opportunity to address their fears around their weight and shape.



Got any other tips or tricks to add to help others around the Thanksgiving holiday? Feel free to share your comments below!





© 2018 by Tillie + True. 

Disclaimer:

 

My coaching is a supportive means to addressing body image and self-love, but it may not be suitable for everyone struggling with clinical eating disorders. (Not all information shared in this space will be helpful in the cycle of clinically disordered eating). If you are suffering from an eating disorder, or mental illness, please seek medical/psychological attention first, then come back to this space and see if it is a good fit for you. 

 

 

Take care of yourself first and foremost. 

 

 

- Founder, Chantal Lacoste